Link Love: November 2015

Posted November 22, 2015 by Lory in links / 10 Comments

 

The-Middle-WindowReview of the Month: The Middle Window

My favorite review this month had to be the one in which Simon of Stuck in a Book fought his “natural aversion to historical fiction” to find at least partial pleasure in a novel most readers — even fans of the author — detest. I love it when our reading expectations are turned upside down!

More of my favorite posts and articles this month:

Halloween Fun

 

List Love

 

Food for Thought

  • Girl With Her Head in a Book points out some of the painful questions that can arise around books and friends. What if you don’t love your friend’s favorite book — or vice versa?
  • Reading and Race: On Slavery and Fiction shares some honest reflections from a white reader, through The Millions
  • A teaching observation prompts some thoughts about how we all experience being observed in life, at Dolce Bellezza
  • At the Bookwyrm’s Hoard, musings about the cost of books and reading speed; are we making the most of our “entertainment hours”?

 

Getting Visual

 

Image of the Month

SmithBedtimeReading in Bed by Jessie Wilcox Smith, found here

Shared in the Sunday Post hosted by Caffeinated Book Reviewer

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10 responses to “Link Love: November 2015

  1. I was reading through this and clicking all the links that said “read me, read me!” (a substantial percentage) when I suddenly came to the reading-speed-and-cost-of-books post. Thank you for including me — and I love the company I’m keeping!

    • You’re very welcome, and thank you for your interesting post. I’ve always been a superfast reader, so I’d be sunk without the library.

  2. Loved that link about when friends don’t like your favorite books. I think blogging has made me cooler about book taste disagreements, because it happens so often. But still when it’s a dear friend and a book I truly love, it can still really get me down.

    • More than once I’ve pressed one of my favorite books upon someone who ends up hating it. It makes me question whether I really know that person, or myself; why DO I love that book anyway? All kinds of existential questions can arise.

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