Month: December 2014

Looking Forward and Back

Posted December 30, 2014 by Lory in blog housekeeping / 11 Comments
Looking Forward and Back

A Janus coin When I started blogging a year ago, I didn’t really have any particular goals in mind, other than to start posting and see what happened. Looking back, there are some things I’m really pleased with and would like to continue into 2015, and some things that I’d like to work on. For […]

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Back to the Classics Challenge

Posted December 28, 2014 by Lory in challenges / 12 Comments
Back to the Classics Challenge

I heard about the Back to the Classics challenge too late to join last year, so I was glad when Karen of Books and Chocolate decided to host it again. Visit the sign-up post for the full rules, but basically the idea is to read and post about 6-12 classics (pre-1965) in different categories during […]

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A Visit to Barsetshire: The Brandons

Posted December 26, 2014 by Lory in reviews / 4 Comments
A Visit to Barsetshire: The Brandons

Angela Thirkell, The Brandons (1939) After reading Anthony Trollope’s Barchester Towers, I was curious to read some of the novels that Angela Thirkell set in the same (imaginary) county of Barsetshire. Starting in 1933 and extending through World War II and into the 1950s, she chronicled the lives and loves of several interlinked circles of […]

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Words and Pictures: A Christmas Carol

Posted December 23, 2014 by Lory in quotes / 6 Comments
Words and Pictures: A Christmas Carol

It is a fair, even-handed, noble adjustment of things, that while there is infection in disease and sorrow, there is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good-humor. Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol (1843) Image: “Merry Old Santa” by Thomas Nast (Public Domain Review)

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The Immortality of Love: Little Women

Posted December 19, 2014 by Lory in reviews / 13 Comments
The Immortality of Love: Little Women

Louisa May Alcott, Little Women (1868-9)   What makes Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women immortal, when as a nineteenth-century moral story for the young it should properly have been forgotten long ago? A portion of the reading population might like to forget it, as Elaine Showalter points out in her illuminating introduction to my Penguin […]

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Gems of 2014

Posted December 16, 2014 by Lory in lists / 22 Comments
Gems of 2014

It’s time for an end-of-year roundup! With this post, I’m introducing the Emerald City Book Review Gem, to be awarded to my favorite books of the year in various genres and categories. (Note that books were read and reviewed, but not necessarily published in 2014.) Click on each title to be taken to my original […]

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A Christmas Gift: I Saw Three Ships

Posted December 15, 2014 by Lory in reviews / 17 Comments
A Christmas Gift: I Saw Three Ships

Elizabeth Goudge, I Saw Three Ships (1969)   Just in time for Christmas, the wonderful folks at David R. Godine, Publisher have reprinted their edition of Elizabeth Goudge’s story I Saw Three Ships. In this brief tale set in the West Country of England a couple of centuries ago, we are introduced to the irrepressible […]

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Remember Them in Bonds: Sapphira and the Slave Girl

Posted December 12, 2014 by Lory in reviews / 11 Comments
Remember Them in Bonds: Sapphira and the Slave Girl

Willa Cather, Sapphira and the Slave Girl (1940)   Willa Cather’s quiet, elegaic final novel, Sapphira and the Slave Girl, is the only one of her novels set in her birthplace of rural Northern Virginia. Taking up events and characters from the author’s own family history, it gives us a window into a time and […]

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Words and Pictures: A Lost Lady

Posted December 11, 2014 by Lory in quotes / 2 Comments
Words and Pictures: A Lost Lady

He did not think of these books as something invented to beguile the idle hour, but as living creatures, caught in the very behaviour of living, — surprised behind their misleading severity of form and phrase. He was eavesdropping upon the past, being let into the great world that had plunged and glittered and sumptuously […]

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