Darkness in Delphi: My Brother Michael

Posted September 19, 2014 by Lory in reviews / 9 Comments

Mary Stewart, My Brother Michael (1960)

 

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Mary Stewart is rightly acclaimed for creating wonderfully robust settings in her books, which serve as much more than mere stage backdrops to the action. So strong is the sense of place, sometimes, that the setting almost becomes a character or a plot device in its own right.

Such is the case with My Brother Michael, which I picked up in honor of Mary Stewart Reading Week. The place is Delphi, on the slopes of Mount Parnassus in Greece, once considered the navel of the world and still one of the most numinous sites of the Western world. While telling one of her thrilling tales of mystery and danger, Stewart also manages to evoke the spirit of Greece, both ancient and modern, in a strikingly vivid way. From a memorable scene of the difficulties of passing a bus on a mountain road, to explorations of the god-haunted landscape of Parnassus, to stories of some of the tragedies incurred during and after the Second World War, she makes us feel that we have encountered this brilliant, desolate land, and experienced some of its treasures — and its burdens.

I said, “It’s this confounded country. It does things to one — mentally and physically and, I suppose, morally. The past is so living and the present so intense and the future so blooming imminent. The light seems to burn life into you twice as intensely as anywhere else I’ve known. I suppose that’s why the Greeks did what they did so miraculously, and why they could stay themselves through twenty generations of slavery that would have crushed any other race on earth.”

To summarize the plot of a Mary Stewart novel is to spoil many of its surprises, so I’ll just say that our heroine, Camilla, traveling alone in Greece after the breakup of a bad relationship, gets into more than she’d bargained for when she takes an unusual opportunity to transport herself from Athens to Delphi. After she meets up with our hero, an Englishman hunting for some clues to still-unanswered questions around the death of his brother during the war, she definitely loses her right to complain that “Nothing ever happens to me.” One is reminded to be careful what one wishes for — the gods may be listening.

One quibble I had with the narrative was that Camilla is supposed not to understand Greek, yet she reports in great detail conversations that were held in that language, with every nuance of emotion and expression included. This is supposed to be because they were translated for her afterwards, but that explanation is not terribly convincing; indeed, she often is more engaged with what is going on than she should be, were she really as ignorant as she is supposed to be. There is one major plot point that turns on her lack of understanding of the language, but perhaps that could have been dealt with in another way. I know that highly detailed first-person narratives generally require some suspension of disbelief, but this extra bit of implausibility bothered me just slightly.

As in another Stewart novel with a Greek setting, The Moon-Spinners, the romance in My Brother Michael was more implied than explicit. I tend to like them that way, since instant attraction seems more plausible to me than instant falling-into-arms and declaring undying love. (There is never much time in these novels for anything other than instantaneous romance, since the action moves at a pretty fast clip, and most of the time our hero and heroine are busy with pursuing bad guys and other distractions.) Here, aside from a charming teaser at the end, much is left to our imaginations. Sometimes it’s better that way.

Overall, this was one of my favorite Mary Stewart books so far, with its seamless integration of plot, setting and character, and one that I would definitely pick up again. If you’re looking for an intelligent, entertaining and suspenseful read, this is a good place to start.

Darkness in Delphi: My Brother MichaelMy Brother Michael by Mary Stewart
Published by Chicago Review Press in 1990 (originally 1960)
Format: Paperback from Library

 

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9 responses to “Darkness in Delphi: My Brother Michael

  1. I enjoyed this one, but I will admit that one scene in particular keeps it from being a favorite. No, make that two, both of them a little more violent than is usual from Stewart. Still, Stewart remains one of my favorite authors… and I think it's time to reread a few.

    • You're right, but somehow those scenes fit into the context for me. They didn't seem gratuitous, which I really can't take. I also read (but did not review) Airs Above the Ground this week and it was a lot of fun.

  2. And you are right: they aren't gratuitous, and they do fit the story and context. I just find them a bit uncomfortable. Doesn't keep me from reading the book, because it's quite good overall. But I don't find myself re-reading it as often as the others.

    So glad you enjoyed Airs Above the Ground! I read it to my (college-age) daughter and she really loved it, too.

  3. I have a bunch of Mary Stewart books, and I really need to find the time to read her. I love gothic novels and these sound right up my alley! I've heard good things about MY BROTHER MICHAEL in particular. I love those plots that are so delicious you don't even want to talk about them for fear of spoiling things.

    Wendy @ The Midnight Garden

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